HUMA, THE LEANING TEMPLE OF LORD SHIVA

Huma is a little known getaway in western Orissa, 28km east of sambalpur on the bank of Mahanadi. A learning temple of the main attraction here. The place must not to be confused with Humma, which is 110km from Khurda, 6km from Gangam.

After a quick tour of a sambelpur, we set off for hama ona winter afternoon. The light of the setting sun twinkled through the leaves of the trees that formed a green carpet on the hillocks as we drove past the Hirakud dam, the largest in Asia.

The hum of our car engine was only the sound we could hear as we left state highway and entered a narrower road. The cold breeze and the speculator natural beauty kept us quit as our car sped through the path between parallel rows of Sal, sign, akshmani, dudhra and Palash.
The tortuous and bumpy ride had left us tired by the time we reached but we did not mind to short walk of the temple through sylvan surroundings, listening to the gurgle of the clear water of Mahanadi.

Load Vimaleswar is worshipped in the temple, which leans towards the north-east at an angel of 5 to 6 degrees.

Thousand of devotees gather at the temple during Shivaratri, when a mela is held in the aria. Many legends are associated with the origin of the temple. One version credits king Balaram Dev with attempting to build the temple during the fifth century BC. The construction was finally completed between 1617 and 1657 by Ver Ballyar Singh, the king of Sambal pur.

According to another version King Anaganga Veema Deba III. Who was suffering from tuberculosis, erected the temple to ensure his quick recovery.

Resident say that soon after the temple was built, its title to one site with a sound as loud as a thunderclap. Others claim the river current force the temple to stand at an angel with the ground. The quality of the soil is also cited as a factor behind the tilt.

The machinda ghat behind the temple is a favorite among visitors because of the red fishes in the pond. Those staying more than a night, could consider visiting the Debrigard wildlife sanctuary 55km from Sambalpur.

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